Kia Super League update – 16th August

KSL18 update (4)

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England vs New Zealand – 3rd ODI notes

ICC Women’s Championship standings

TEAM M W L T Points NRR
NZ 9 6 3 0 12 0.401
AUS 6 5 1 0 10 1.105
ENG 9 5 4 0 10 0.571
PAK 6 4 2 0 8 0.581
WI 6 3 3 0 6 -0.616
IND 6 2 4 0 4 0.066
SA 6 2 4 0 4 -1.147
SL 6 0 6 0 0 -1.350
  • New Zealand’s 4 wicket victory at Grace Road ended a run of five consecutive ODI losses, and nine losses in all formats, vs England.
  • 220 was the second highest target New Zealand have successfully chased in an ODI vs England.
  • Sophie Devine is the sixth White Ferns batter to make an ODI century vs England, and the 3rd woman overall to make five ODI centuries for New Zealand.
  • Until this summer, it had been three years since any woman had made a century vs England in an ODI.  Lizelle Lee’s 117 at Hove on 12th June, and Devine’s 117* today are the two highest scores in women’s ODI chases vs England.
  • This was Devine’s first century vs England and her first against any side in an ODI chase.
  • Devine’s six to finish the chase meant she finished the series as top runscorer (164 runs), just pipping Amy Jones (161), and exactly 100 runs clear of New Zealand’s next best (Maddy Green).
  • New Zealand’s next highest individual score in the series was Devine’s 33 in the 1st ODI.
  • Devine, who averaged 16.61 in 19 ODI inning vs England before this series, was the only White Ferns batter to make a score over 30 in the series.
  • In ten ODI innings since the World Cup, Devine has 700 runs at an average of 87.50 and a SR of 106.87, with four centuries and three fifties.
  • Devine had one century in 73 innings up until the end of the 2017 World Cup.
  • Devine has 142 more runs than her closest challenger since the World Cup (England’s Tammy Beaumont on 558).
  • Beaumont and Devine’s runs at Grace Road made them the 6th and 7th women respectively, to bring up 1,000 ICC Women’s Championship career runs.
  • Suzie Bates’ 53 runs were her worst returns in a three match ODI series, and her third worst for a series of any length.
  • Devine and Satterthwaite’s 54 run partnership was New Zealand’s only fifty partnership for the 3rd wicket or lower in this series, and their only 50+ stand for the 4th wicket or lower in either ODIs or T20Is in England this summer.
  • Leigh Kasperek’s 5-39 were New Zealand’s second best ODI figures vs England women, and the eighth 5+ wicket haul taken by any woman against England in ODIs.  The last was Beth McNeill’s 6-32 for New Zealand at Lincoln on February 2008.
  • Kasperek is the leading wicket taker in women’s ODIs since the World Cup (24), followed by England’s Sophie Ecclestone (20).
  • 104 at Grace Road today, to go with their 111 partnership in the 1st ODI at Headingley, made Tammy Beaumont and Amy Jones the first English opening pair to record two century stands in a bilateral women’s ODI series.
  • Beaumont & Jones are in fact, just the sixth English opening pair to share two century stands in their ODI careers
Opening partnership Inns NO Runs High Ave 100 50
Atkins & SJ Taylor 19 1 1239 268 68.83 4 5
Bakewell & Thomas 5 0 521 246 104.20 2 2
Plimmer & Watson 5 0 344 129 68.80 2 1
Hodges & Watson 6 1 440 163 88.00 2 2
Beaumont & Jones 7 0 393 111 56.14 2 1
Edwards & Newton 32 0 1127 142 35.22 2 5
  • Beaumont’s 628 runs (212 in the ODIs vs South Africa, 256 in the T20I tri-series and 160 in the ODIs vs NZ) broke Jan Brittin’s record for the most women’s international runs in an English summer (Brittin scored 338 Test & 258 ODI runs vs New Zealand in 1984).
  • Beaumont has been a part of England’s last seven century partnerships for all wickets in ODIs, and 10 of the 13 England have made since she was recalled in June 2016.
  • England’s collapse of 5-31 from 188/5 to 219 all out, was their worst for the last 5 wickets in an ODI since they lost 5-30 in their loss to India on the opening day of the 2017 World Cup.

2017-21 ICC Women’s Championship stats

Most runs

Most wickets

T20I tri-nation series (ENG, NZ, SA) preview

Year T20Is Runs/wkt Balls/wkt Run rate Sixes 6/Mat
2009 30 17.77 18.05 5.91 53 1.8
2010 42 16.84 16.53 6.11 89 2.1
2011 32 17.02 17.36 5.88 45 1.4
2012 62 16.94 18.57 5.47 102* 1.6
2013 37 18.73 19.67 5.71 63 1.7
2014 71 18.42 18.90 5.85 138 1.9
2015 30 17.81 18.76 5.70 66 2.2
2016 56 18.86 18.70 6.05 140 2.5
2017 13 17.87 16.57 6.47 42 3.2
2018 30 23.01 20.07 6.88 106 3.5
*ESPNcricinfo and other sources don’t have complete scorecards for two T20Is in 2012.

After a two year wait, women’s T20I cricket returns to England
South Africa’s match vs New Zealand at Taunton on Wednesday afternoon will be the first women’s T20I played in England since 7th July 2016.

In the years since England’s 3-0 whitewash of Pakistan, women’s T20 cricket has transformed out of all recognition.  Increased international contracts, the WBBL (which began in 2015-16) and KSL (2016) all mean that women’s cricket is now a professional sport at the top level.

The T20I run rate in 2018 (6.88 rpo) is currently the highest for a calendar year in which more than 10 matches have been played.

Every major women’s T20I series played since last years ODI World Cup has been among the fastest scoring in history.  The five series with highest run rates in women’s T20I history have each included one or more of the teams taking part in this tri-series.

Highest run rate for a women’s T20I series/tournament:

8.19 rpo IND/AUS/ENG tri-nation series, March 2018
7.87 rpo Ashes T20I series, Nov 2017
7.68 rpo South Africa v India, Feb 2018
7.48 rpo South Africa v England, Feb 2016
7.28 rpo New Zealand v West Indies, March 2018

The number of sixes hit in some recent series have been so great that they exceed totals for previous editions of the World T20, let alone two or three teams series.

In just 5 matches, The South Africa vs India series in February racked up 42 sixes.  By far the highest total for a bilateral series, and the 4th most for any women’s T20I series or tournament, regardless of length or the number of participants.

Most sixes in a women’s T20I series/tournament:

57 – 2014 World T20 in Bangladesh (27 matches)
53 – 2010 World T20 in West Indies (15 matches)
43 – 2016 World T20 in India (23 matches)
42 – South Africa v India, 2018 (5 matches)
30 – IND/AUS/ENG tri-series, 2018 (7 matches)
30 – 2012 World T20 in Sri Lanka (15 matches)
27 – 2009 World T20 in England (15 matches)

The average rate at which sixes have been hit in the history of women’s T20Is is one six for every 108 balls faced.  Since the 2017 World Cup, the rate is now once every 61.56 balls, comparable to the most recent WBBL season (65.39).  During the record-breaking South Africa vs India series in February, batters were hitting sixes once every 24 balls.

The Guardian recently published a list of the world’s top 20 women’s cricketers.  Ten of the names on that list will be taking part in this series, and that doesn’t even include players such as England’s Tammy Beaumont, South Africa’s Chloe Tryon or New Zealand’s Amelia Kerr.

The players taking part in this series have made over a third (15 of 42) of all domestic & international women’s T20 centuries.

Even in light of the spectacular 2017 World Cup, the British public won’t have witnessed a women’s cricket tournament like this before.


A number that might be a counter to all this excitement is the 20.07 balls bowled per wicket in 2018. i.e. despite the massively increased run rate and six hitting, the risk of wickets falling has decreased.

This isn’t the case in women’s ODIs, where the run rate and runs scored per wicket have markedly increased in recent yearsrecent years, but wickets are still falling at the same rate they always have in the 50-over era (roughly once every six overs).


WT20I winloss 2016-19 June 2018

Last 8 results:
England – LWWWWLLL
New Zealand – WWWWWWWW
South Africa – LLLWLWWW

T20I head-to-head record:

England vs New Zealand
Matches 19
ENG wins 14
NZ wins 5

England vs South Africa
Matches 15
ENG wins 13
SA wins 1
No result 1

New Zealand vs South Africa
Matches 5
NZ wins 4
SA wins 1

WT20i winloss 2016 bat 1st

WT20i winloss 2016 field 1st

While the historic head-to-head record (heavily) favours England, this series is likely to be much closer.  New Zealand are the form team in world cricket, and come into this series on the back of an unprecedented run of three consecutive 400+ ODI totals vs Ireland.  South Africa are the outsiders but the ODI series vs England showed the bowling quality and power-hitting they bring to this series.


 

New Zealand flying high as Bates nears record
Since their 2016 World T20 semi-final loss to the West Indies, New Zealand have only lost one T20 international, vs Australia at the MCG on 17th February 2017.  The White Ferns are currently on an 11 match wining streak, the 3rd longest such run in women’s T20Is.  Included in that run is a 4-0 whitewash of the West Indies in New Zealand.

Before their ODI demolition of Ireland, New Zealand also played the Irish in a T20I.  In that game at Dublin on 6th June, the hosts set the White Ferns a target of 137.

Suzie Bates and Jess Watkin blitzed their way 142/0 in 11 overs.  Watkin’s 77* was the 3rd highest score by a T20I debutant, their partnership was New Zealand’s highest in T20Is and their run rate (12.90 rpo), was the highest ever for a completed women’s international innings.

As well as youngsters like Watkin and Kerr, braking new ground, several experienced batters are at the peak of their powers for New Zealand.

Suzie Bates (2,515) is now just 91 runs away from breaking Charlotte Edwards’ (2,605) T20I career runs record.  Bates is the highest run scorer in the KSL (492) and the highest scoring overseas player (964) in the WBBL.  She is the only player to have made centureis in both the WBBL & KSL.

Amy Satterthwaite claimed the player of the season award in WBBL03, an honour which could just as easily have been given to Sophie Devine.

Having supplanted Rachel Priest at the top of the order, Devine has a new-found consistency since the World Cup (3 centuries & 3 fifties in 7 ODIs).  In T20Is Devine’s SR is the 4th highest of any woman to have faced 100+ balls since the start of 2016 (152.17). If she stays in for any length of time today, Devine will likely hit her 50th T20I six, making her just the 2nd woman to that mark.

Priest’s replacement with the gloves, 33 year old Katey Martin made her maiden T20I fifty against the West Indies in March.  An innings later she made her 2nd, and two innings after that, her 3rd.

No-one has taken more T20I wickets since the start of 2016 than Leigh Kasperek (31).  Holly Huddlestone and Lea Tahuhu will be important, but expect Kasperek and Amelia Kerr (whose economy of 4.58 rpo is exceptional, given current run rates) to be New Zealand’s main threats with the ball in this series.

New Zealand (5.78 rpo) are the only side with a collective economy rate below six runs an over since the start of 2016.


As in ODIs, England are unrecognisable since Mark Robinson took charge at the start of 2016.  Only New Zealand have a better T20I win/loos record in that time, and England’s run rate (7.46 rpo) is the highest of any team.  It’s needed to be though, as their economy rate is the second worst (6.89 rpo), behind only Ireland.

A large part of that ER is down to England conceding 7.46 rpo when fielding first.  Despite this, England have the best win/loss ratio among chasing sides since the start of 2016.

Danni Wyatt’s maiden hundred, at Manuka Oval in November was the first ever in a  women’s T20I chase.  She followed that with 124 vs India at Mumbai in March as England completed a women’s T20I record chase of 199.

Wyatt and Tammy Beaumont now have 10 T20I sixes each.  Nothing compared with the likes of Devine, Dottin, Lee or Tryon but still something of a significant milestone.  Those 10 sixes mean they’re currently level with Charlotte Edwards on the most T20I career sixes for England.  This series is sure to see them break that symbolic barrier.

After taking an inexperienced squad to India, England will be fielding their full-strength T20I XI for the first time since the Ashes, which should make up for some of the deficiencies experienced in that series.  After their record chase, England went on to lose their remaining three fixtures.

England’s top three batters in that series (Wyatt, Beaumont and Natalie Sciver) were as strong as their Australian counterparts but the rest of batting order fell well short:

England’s top 3 run-scorers (Wyatt, Sciver & Beaumont):
488 off 321 (SR 152.02 or 9.12 rpo)

Rest of England squad:
188 off 233 (SR 80.69 or 4.84 rpo)

Australia’s top 3 run-scorers (Lanning, Villani & Mooney):
452 off 313 (SR 144.41 or 8.66 rpo)

Rest of Australia squad:
323 off 228 (SR 141.66 or 8.50 rpo)

The return of Sarah Taylor and Katherine Brunt with the bat should go some way to improving those figures.  Likewise, Brunt and Shrubsole’s return with the ball will be welcome after some fairly toothless bowling displays in the Indian series.


South Africa are the wildcard.  Their historic and recent record suggests an England/New Zealand final, but they have some of the most exciting individual players in world cricket, who could take games away on their own.

Shanbim Ismail is the world’s fastest bowler, and in Marizanne Kapp and Dane van Niekerk they have two key members of the all-conquering Sydney Sixers WBBL squads.  Among bowlers to have delivered 10+ overs, Kapp has the best career economy rate (4.66 rpo) in the WBBL (Brunt incidentally is 2nd, with 5.15 rpo) and has been going at 5.48 rpo in T20Is since the start of 2016.

Van Niekerk was the 3rd highest wicket taker in WBBL03 (20 wickets), despite not playing the whole season due to international commitments.

Not even Sophie Devine can match the rate at which Chloe Tryon currently hits sixes (11.58 balls per six since the start of 2016).  By that measure, Lizelle Lee is in 4th place (22.27) and captain Van Niekerk is in 9th (37.08).

Tryon’s innings strike rate of 457.14 for her 32* (7) vs India at Senwes Park in February is the highest ever SR for a 25+ run score in women’s or men’s T20 international cricket.

WT20I Bp6

While their boundary hitting is spectacular, South Africa’s running leaves a lot to be desired, and they haven’t settled on a best XI or consistent batting order.

All of Lee’s hitting power amounts to a career T20I SR of 97.15 (rising to a decent, but not spectacular 110.77 since the start of 2016).  Despite the presence of Lee & Tryon in their ranks, South Africa have only posted 150+ totals three times since the start of 2016 and have a high total of 169 in that period.

Teenage batting sensation, Laura Wolvaardt has yet to shine in T20 cricket at domestic or international level.


SQUADS

New Zealand: Suzie Bates (c), Bernadine Bezuidenhout (wk), Sophie Devine, Kate Ebrahim, Maddy Green, Holly Huddleston, Hayley Jensen, Leigh Kasperek, Amelia Kerr, Katey Martin, Anna Peterson, Hannah Rowe, Amy Satterthwaite, Lea Tahuhu, Jess Watkin

South Africa: Dane van Niekerk (c), Lizelle Lee (wk), Chloe Tryon, Mignon du Preez, Marizanne Kapp, Shabnim Ismail, Ayabonga Khaka, Masabata Klaas, Raisibe Ntozakhe, Suné Luus, Laura Wolvaardt, Andrie Steyn, Zintle Mali, Tazmin Brits, Stacey Lackay.

England: Heather Knight (c), Tammy Beaumont, Katherine Brunt, Sophie Ecclestone, Georgia Elwiss, Tash Farrant, Jenny Gunn, Danielle Hazell, Amy Jones (wk), Laura Marsh, Anya Shrubsole, Nat Sciver, Sarah Taylor (wk), Danni Wyatt.
To join the squad for the June 24 match: Katie George, Lauren Winfield.