ICC Women’s Championship preview – England vs New Zealand

ICC Women’s Championship standings

Team Mat Won Lost Tied N/R Net RR Points
New Zealand 6 5 1 0 0 1.489 10
Australia 6 5 1 0 0 1.105 10
Pakistan 6 4 2 0 0 0.581 8
England 6 3 3 0 0 0.050 6
West Indies 6 3 3 0 0 -0.616 6
India 6 2 4 0 0 0.066 4
South Africa 6 2 4 0 0 -1.147 4
Sri Lanka 6 0 6 0 0 -1.350 0

The overall ODI record between these sides (ENG wins 32; NZ wins 33; 1 tie) suggests a tight contest, but on closer inspection the rivalry has been characterised by extended periods of dominance from one side or the other.

In their first twenty years of ODI cricket, beginning with their a meeting at the 1973 World Cup, England and New Zealand played 11 times.  England won eight of those games, and New Zealand just two, with one match ending as a tie.

From July 1993 – August 2007, New Zealand won 26 and lost six, a run that ended with the White Ferns’ only bilateral series win in England.

In recent times, England have been similarly dominant in ODIs vs New Zealand as they have been in T20Is.  Since that series loss in 2007, England have won 18 and lost five, including winning ten of the last twelve meetings.  England have come out on top in all five World Cup meetings between the sides during that period.

England have won six of the previous ten bilateral series, including the last four in a row (though New Zealand did win two of the three ICC Women’s Championship designated fixtures in their most recent five-match series)

ENG 3-0 NZ, 1984 in England
NZ 3-0 ENG, 1996 in England
NZ 5-0 ENG, 2000 in New Zealand
NZ 3-0 ENG, 2000 in New Zealand
ENG 3-2 NZ, 2004 in England
NZ 3-2 ENG, 2007 in England
ENG 3-1 NZ, 2008 in New Zealand
ENG 3-2 NZ, 2010 in England
ENG 3-0 NZ, 2012 in New Zealand
ENG 3-2 NZ, 2015 in New Zealand (NZ won the ICCWC fixtures 2-1)


England‘s current ICCWC campaign began with the Ashes ODIs in October (lost 2-1).  An experimental side then lost a non-Championship series in India 2-1, before England began their summer with a 2-1 ICCWC victory over South Africa last month.

Starting with their opening day loss to India at the World Cup, England have begun their last four ODI series or tournaments with a loss.

New Zealand top the table but have shown signs of vulnerability.  At Sharjah on 5th November, they lost for the first time to Pakistan, after Suzie Bates, Sophie Devine and Amy Satterthwaite were all dismissed in single figures.

A whitewash of the West Indies in both formats at home in March was more convincing but there were still concerns.  Bates Devine & Satterthwaite were the only players to make fifties and were a familiar sight as New Zealand’s top three runscorers in the series.

In truth, in both ODIs and T20Is, the West Indies let slip chances of victory that teams such as England or Australia probably wouldn’t have in the same situation.  Specifically, the 1st ODI (lost by 1 run) and the 1st and 3rd T20Is (lost by 8 & 1 runs respectively).

New Zealand’s astonishing exploits in Ireland last month are well documented but it’s hard to see them having much of a bearing on this series.


Just as Bates & Devine have dominated New Zealand’s scoring in T20I cricket since the World Cup, the same is true in ODIs.

Devine (428) and Bates (307) have scored 58.8% of  the runs score by New Zealand’s batters in the current edition of the ICC Women’s Championship.

Sophie Devine is the top runscorer in this edition of the ICC women’s Championship (428 runs).  When she followed up her 103 with 62 vs Pakistan at h in Oct/Nov, it was the first time she had made 50+ scores in consecutive ODI innings.  In all since the World Cup, Devine has three centuries and three fifties in seven innings and begins this series on a run of four 50+ scores in a row.

Since moving to the top of the order after the World Cup, Devine has shared one century stand & three fifties in five innings with Suzie Bates at an average of 80.00.  Having reached the milestone of 1,000 runs as a T20I partnership during the tri-series, Bates and Devine need 37 runs together in this series to bring up 1,000 as an ODI partnership.

While Devine begins the series on a run of four consecutive 50+ ODI scores, Suzie Bates is currently on a run of three in a row.

Bates (average 52.20) is one of just two women with 1,000+ runs as an ODI opener at an average over 50. The other is Debbie Hockley (54.54), whose New Zealand ODI runs record Bates recently surpassed.

Bates also comes into the series on a run of excellent domestic List A form in England. Her 358 runs for champions Hampshire were the most scored in the 2018 County Championship.  This was the second year in succession that Bates finished as top runscorer in the competition.

While Bates has been the best opener of her generation and Devine is in the form of her life, neither have particularly strong ODI record vs England.

Bates averages 28.48 in 26 ODI innings vs England, and Devine 16.61 in 19 innings.  In both cases their lowest average against any single opponent.

Spinners Leigh Kasperek and Ameila Kerr each have 16 wickets since the World Cup, making them the equal 3rd highest ODI wicket takers in that time.

In just 20 matches, Kerr already has the 2nd most 4+ wicket hauls for New Zealand (4), behind only Aimee Watkins (5 from 103 matches)

Lea Tahuhu may be one of the fastest bowlers in the World but that doesn’t seem to have aided her vs England.  Tahuhu has played 10 times vs England, making them her 2nd most frequent ODI opponent behind Australia (12).  She has just 4 wickets at 76.75 to show for it, an average more than double that against any other opponent.


After centuries in the 2nd & 3rd ODIs vs South Africa, Tammy Beaumont has a chance to become the second woman to make three consecutive ODI hundreds.  Amy Satterthwaite, currently the only woman to do so, went on to make four in a row.

Since Beaumont was recalled in June 2016, only Lizelle Lee (1,591) has score more ODI runs than her (1,419).  Lee has played 14 more innings in that time.

Beaumont is one of only two women with 3+ ODI hundreds to have a conversion rate of 50%. The other is Meg Lanning.

Best women’s ODI conversion rate (3+ centuries)

Player Mat Inns 100 50 CR
MM Lanning (AUS) 66 66 11 11 50.00
TT Beaumont (ENG) 53 46 5 5 50.00
JA Brittin (ENG) 63 59 5 8 38.46
SW Bates (NZ) 112 106 10 24 29.41
SJ Taylor (ENG) 116 109 7 19 26.92
SFM Devine (NZ) 93 80 4 11 26.67
SC Taylor (ENG) 126 120 8 23 25.81
AE Satterthwaite (NZ) 110 104 6 18 25.00
NE Bolton (AUS) 44 44 4 12 25.00

England’s star bowler since the World Cup has been player of the tri-series Sophie Ecclestone.  In ODIs since the World Cup he has 14 wickets at 20.14 and an ER of 3.81.When Beaumont made her 105 at Canterbury v South Africa she became the 2nd fastest woman to make 5 ODI centuries (46 innings) behind only Lanning (35) and the first woman to make three international centuries in an English home season.

Though she missed selection at the start of the summer, no-one has taken more ODI wickets for England during the Mark Robinson-era than recalled Alex Hartley (34).

Anya Shrubsole and Katherine Brunt look back to their best this summer, though Brunt in has a surprisingly poor ODI record vs New Zealand.  Brunt averages 41.21 vs NZ, and hasn’t taken a wicket against them in her last four ODIs.  She averages 30 or less against all other opponents.

On the other hand, Jenny Gunn has the 5th most ODI wickets vs New Zealand (41), and is the highest ranked active player, and highest ranked non-Australian (who tend to play more matches vs NZ) on the list.  30.37% of Gunn’s ODI wickets have been taken vs NZ.

With most of their bowlers in good form, perhaps England’s most pressing concern is who should be Beaumont’s long-term partner at the top of the order in ODIs.  Amy Jones has looked good for as long as her innings have lasted, but needs to make a telling contribution soon, with Danni Wyatt and Lauren Winfield the other options.


Landmarks to look out for

The first match of the series is set to be Sarah Taylor’s 109th as designated wicket keeper, which will break the women’s ODI record currently held by her predecessor as England keeper, Jane Smit.

Having become the first woman to take 50 T20I stumpings during the tri-series, Taylor (currently on 48) is nearing the ODI record currently held by Anju Jain (51).

Taylor (3,911) also needs 89 runs to become the 9th woman to score 4,000 ODI runs.

If she can score 129 runs in this series, Beaumont, who led the scoring in both the ODIs vs South Africa (212) and the T20I tri-series (256), will break Jan Brittin’s record for most women’s international runs in an English summer (Brittin scored 596 across Tests and ODIs in 1984).

Gunn (143) can overtake Alex Blackwell (144) in this series to move up to 4th place for most women’s ODI appearances.

Bates has captained New Zealand 73 times. During this series, she’ll overtake Merissa Aguilleira (74), to move up to 4th place on the list of most women’s ODIs as captain.

Bates needs 35 more runs to become the fifth woman to record 10,000 List A runs.

Most recorded women’s List A runs

  M I NO R HS Ave 100 50
CM Edwards 397 380 68 16465 199* 52.77 42 103
M Raj 317 280 95 11503 163* 62.17 14 91
KL Rolton 257 245 47 10487 173 52.96 23 74
SC Taylor 289 276 43 10195 156* 43.75 17 66
SW Bates 259 247 33 9965 183* 46.56 23 59

Verdict

If England overcome their recent issue of slow starts to ODI series, and New Zealand don’t find more telling contributions from their lower to middle order, a clean sweep is on the cards for the hosts.


ICC Women’s Championship
ENGLAND vs NEW ZEALAND

Fixtures:

7th July
1st ODI at Headingley

10th July
2nd ODI at County Ground, Derby

13th July
3rd ODI at Grace Road


ICC Women’s Championship stats

Most runs

Most wickets

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