ICC Women’s Championship preview – New Zealand vs West Indies

Stats derived from ESPNcricinfo statsguru.

The second round of 2017-20 ICC Women’s Championship fixtures begins at Bert Sutcliffe Oval on 4th March, when New Zealand play host to West Indies.

The series will be the first major examination for two sides that disappointed at the 2017 World Cup, both being eliminated before the knock-out stages.

2013 finalists, West Indies could only manage consolation victories vs Sri Lanka and Pakistan during their dismal campaign.  New Zealand were unlucky with the weather (their crucial group match with South Africa was the only game abandoned during the tournament), but came off comfortably second best in their group stage encounters against eventual semi-finalists Australia, England and India.

Since then, the West Indies have brushed aside Sri Lanka 3-0 in an error-strewn series at home in October 2017, and New Zealand have beaten Pakistan 2-1 in the UAE in October/November.

New Zealand’s loss at Sharjah on 5th November was their first defeat in any format against Pakistan.  That result would ordinarily prove costly in what looks set to be a hard fought ICC Women’s Championship, but the White Ferns are fortunate that they have automatically qualified as hosts for the 2021 World Cup.

In ODIs, New Zealand and West Indies have met 16 times. New Zealand have won eight and West Indies seven, with one no result.

The contest has been marked by extreme home advantage, with West Indies winning six of seven meetings in the Caribbean, and the White Ferns winning all three meetings in New Zealand.

Last 8 ODI results between NZ & WI:

NZ won by 9 wickets at Bert Sutcliffe Oval, 2014
NZ won by 94 runs at Bert Sutcliffe Oval, 2014
NZ won by 107 runs at Bert Sutcliffe Oval, 2014
WI won by 5 wickets at Warner Park St Kitts, 2014
WI won by 65 runs at Warner Park St Kitts, 2014
WI won by 8 wickets at Warner Park St Kitts, 2014
WI won by 4 runs at Warner Park St Kitts, 2014
NZ won by 8 wickets at Taunton, 2017 World Cup

This will be West Indies women’s second ever tour of New Zealand. The previous tour, in 2014, finished with series whitewashes for New Zealand in both ODIs (3-0) and T20Is (4-0).

West Indies have won just 2 of their last 11 ODI fixtures away from home, with their only victories in that sequence being their encounters with Pakistan and Sri Lanka during the group stages of the 2017 World Cup.

Since West Indies last visited New Zealand, the White Ferns have won 14 of 21 matches at home, with their only losses coming at the hands of England and Australia.

At neutral venues, specifically their six World Cup meetings, New Zealand have the upper hand over West Indies, 4-1 with one match abandoned during the 2005 World Cup.  The West Indies only victory vs New Zealand in World Cups was in 2013 in India, perhaps not coincidentally in lower, slower conditions that are most akin to their own at home.

West Indies captain, Stafanie Taylor has the most runs (526) and most wickets (21) in NZ/WI ODI contests and also has the highest individual score in these matches (135* at Sabina Park in Oct 2013), although her record in the few matches she’s played in New Zealand (3) is less impressive – 77 runs at 25.66 and 2 wickets at 37.00.

The run rate in women’s ODIs has seen a marked increase over the last few years, in the wake of expanded pools of contracted international players and nascent professional domestic T20 leagues in the form of WBBL and KSL.

Women’s ODI run rate:
2014 – 3.84 rpo (38 matches)
2015 – 3.91 rpo (34 matches)
2016 – 4.33 rpo (57 matches)
2017 – 4.41 rpo (70 matches)
2018 – 4.55 rpo (3 matches)

The ODI playing conditions have also changed since the 2017 World Cup, which may even see run rates escalate further.

As the below tables indicate, not only have West Indies failed to keep pace with the increasing ODI run rates of recent years, they’ve fallen back from the position they were in previously.  West Indies are one of the few batting sides to have a lower run rate, and to average fewer runs per wicket in the 2016-2018 period than they did in 2013-15.  By contrast, New Zealand are one of the sides at the forefront of the batting revolution.


Women’s ODI win/loss record 2013-2015
Average run rate: 3.94 rpo   Average runs per wicket: 23.31

Team Win / Loss W/L Ratio Bat ave RR Bowl ave. ER
AUS 19 / 5 3.800 32.92 4.75 22.67 4.16
ENG 18 / 9 2.000 29.56 4.54 24.17 4.20
SA 18 / 11 1.636 23.45 3.68 18.98 3.58
IND 12 / 8 1.500 26.85 4.02 21.12 3.77
WI 20 / 18 1.111 22.81 4.01 23.07 3.91
NZ 16 / 16 1.000 26.68 4.38 22.85 3.89
PAK 13 / 19 0.684 19.80 3.46 21.82 3.58
SL 6 / 24 0.250 18.20 3.50 32.50 4.49
BAN 2 / 8 0.250 16.75 3.22 26.27 3.77
IRE 0 / 6 0.000 9.90 2.56 28.93 4.56

 

Women’s ODI win/loss record since the start of 2016
Average run rate: 4.38 rpo   Average runs per wicket: 26.89

Team Win / Loss W/L Ratio Bat ave RR Bowl ave. ER
AUS 22 / 6 3.666 39.41 5.22 25.44 4.52
IND 25 / 7 3.571 37.96 4.67 20.58 3.84
ENG 21 / 6 3.500 33.19 5.25 23.10 4.12
NZ 17 / 10 1.700 33.44 5.07 25.19 4.19
SA 23 / 24 0.958 26.82 4.50 26.09 4.29
WI 9 / 12 0.750 20.82 3.75 24.22 4.03
BAN 3 / 8 0.375 16.28 3.04 25.14 4.22
SL 4 / 22 0.181 18.12 3.54 36.08 4.68
PAK 3 / 20 0.150 20.99 3.75 39.35 5.36
IRE 1 / 13 0.076 17.30 3.37 43.39 5.14

Since the start of 2016 (essentially the post-WBBL era), New Zealand’s Amy Satterthwaite has the highest batting average in women’s ODIs (76.41) and only South Africa’s Mignon du Preez (1,361) has scored more runs than Satterthwaite’s 1,299 in that period.  Du Preez has played 47 ODIs to Satterthwaite’s 27.

Satterthwaite is one of six New Zealanders among the top 25 in terms of ODI batting strike rate (200+ BF) since the start of 2016.  Only England, with seven, have more players that highly placed.  The first West Indian on that list is Deandra Dottin in 26th (76.83).  Dottin is the only West Indian with a strike above the ODI average for the period (68.41).

Dottin, who made 104* vs Pakistan at the World Cup, is also the only West Indian to have made an ODI century since the start of 2016.  Stafanie Taylor’s batting average of 34.31 is relatively modest, especially given her career record, but that still makes her West Indies most consistent performer with the bat in that time-frame.  Taylor has more 50+ scores (7) than all her her teammates combined (6) since the start of 2016.

Women;s ODI batting pre&post WBBL

Where West Indies continue to be effective is in their bowling economy rate.  Only India (3.84 rpo) have a better ODI ER than West Indies 4.03 since the start of 2016.  Once again however, West Indies bowlers fare less well away from the Caribbean (ER of 4.42 rpo away vs 3.48 rpo at home).

Among bowlers to have taken 12+ ODI wickets since the start of 2016, New Zealand have three bowlers among the top six in the averages.

Best ODI bowling average since start of 2016 (12+ wickets):

16.74 RS Gayakwad IND (39 wickets)
17.31 LM Kasperek NZ (16)
17.53 HR Huddleston NZ (30)
17.77 S Pandey IND (45)
18.53 HL Ferling AUS (13)
18.92 HM Rowe NZ (13)
19.75 ASS Fletcher WI (24)
19.78 Khadija Tul Kubra BAN (19)
20.14 E Bisht (35)
20.73 SR Taylor (19)

Afy Fletcher, in 7th is the first West Indian on the list, closely followed by Taylor in 10th. Fletcher and Taylor are also among three West Indians to feature in the top 10 for best ODI economy rate since the start of 2016 (although one of them, Shakera Selman is injured so won’t feature in this series).

Best ODI economy rate since the start of 2016 (50+ overs bowled):

2.87 M Joshi IND
3.42 E Bisht IND
3.44 GM Harris AUS
3.47 LA Marsh ENG
3.49 SR Taylor WI
3.53 SC Selman WI
3.57 ASS Fletcher WI
3.59 Poonam Yadav IND
3.61 IMHC Joyce IRE
3.61 DB Sharma IND

A few economical bowlers can only do so much, however.  For West Indies to return to the top ranks of women’s ODI cricket, their batters must adapt to a rapidly evolving game.  There are few places with more favourable conditions to begin that process than New Zealand.

Since the start of 2016, the ODI run rate in New Zealand has been the second highest in the world (4.99 rpo), and wickets have been harder to come by (a cost of 35.93 runs per wicket) than in any other nation.

Women’s ODI run rate by host nation since the start of 2016:

Country ODIs Runs Wkts Balls Ave. RR
AUS 11 5087 160 6112 31.79 4.99
NZ 11 4958 138 5961 35.93 4.99
ENG 33 13753 465 17415 29.58 4.74
SA 23 8996 327 12240 27.51 4.41
IRE 6 1965 82 2802 23.96 4.21
UAE 3 1078 47 1585 22.94 4.08
SL 24 8063 344 12331 23.44 3.92
BAN 5 1652 76 2555 21.74 3.88
IND 6 1920 84 3152 22.86 3.65
WI 8 2519 136 4269 18.52 3.54
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