The Widening T20 Experience Gap

The Women’s World T20 in the Caribbean next year promises to be the most “professional” yet. Several players will have the benefit of three full years of WBBL & KSL experience under their belts.

This unprecedented concentration of high-quality cricket already seems to have had an impact on the brand of T20 being played. The increasing dominance of boundary hitting, including a dramatic spike in the frequency of six-hitting, has been noticeable in the WBBL and KSL matches played since the 2016 World T20.

comparison major women's T20 batting stats

The major beneficiaries of this extra experience are of course England and Australia, though some nations have been notably more active than others in getting their players involved in the nascent professional leagues.

Pakistan have played the most T20I fixtures (8) since the 2016 tournament, with India 2nd on 7. Once the Ashes are completed on 21st November, England and Australia (currently on 3 and 4 matches played) will have added 3 to their tallies, while Pakistan/New Zealand will have played 4 and West Indies/Sri Lanka 3.

Pakistan then will remain out in front purely in T20I terms but, thanks to the WBBL and KSL, large numbers of English and Australian players are in fact streets ahead in terms of recent high-quality match experience. Heather Knight has played 31 major T20 matches (combined T20I, WBBL & KSL) since the 2016 World T20 and Ellyse Perry has played 25, with the majority of their international teammates not far behind.

On the other hand, Pakistan are the only top eight nation not have a single player feature in a professional T20 league.

New Zealand’s Rachel Priest and Suzie Bates lead the way in terms major T20 experience since the last World T20 (32 matches each). This despite New Zealand not having a professional domestic league of their own. Other key players such as Lea Tahuhu, Amy Satterthwaite (27 each) and Sophie Devine (21) have also been in demand (and importantly, made available by New Zealand Cricket).

West Indies Stafanie Taylor and Hayley Matthews have each played just 3 T20Is since their triumph in 2016 World T20 final but, as key players for their respective WBBL & KSL sides, they sit 4th & 5th in terms of major T20 experience since then. They, along with Deandra Dottin are the exception though. After seeming under-cooked at the 2017 World Cup, the majority of WI players will start the World T20 having played just a handful of major T20 matches since the last tournament.

South Africa’s Marizanne Kapp, Dane van Niekerk and Lizelle Lee haven’t played any international T20 since the 2016 World T20. Their WBBL and KSL stints though mean they’ve still played more games of high-level professional T20 (Lee 12; Van Niekerk 16; Kapp 23) against a variety of international players than any of the Pakistan squad.

The best domestic players in England and Australia are now playing with and against international talent, under the scrutiny and pressure of increasing crowds and media coverage with a greater regularity than the majority of international players from South Africa, West Indies, India, Sri Lanka or Pakistan.

Indian players weren’t made available for WBBL or KSL contracts during the inaugural seasons of those tournaments. With no women’s IPL, the majority of India’s players (with the exception of Smriti Mandhana and Harmanpreet Kaur, who both played in WBBL02)  have no more top-level T20 experience in recent times than those from Pakistan or Sri Lanka.

With WBBL03 almost upon us and an expanded KSL next year, the best English and Australian players (as well as a select few from NZ, SA & WI) could potentially play a further 28 major T20 matches outside the international arena before the World T20 begins in November 2018.

 


Major women’s T20 matches played since the 2016 World T20:

Player Matches T20I WBBL KSL
RH Priest (NZ) 32 4 14 14
SW Bates (NZ) 32 4 16 12
HC Knight (ENG) 31 3 14 14
SR Taylor (WI) 29 3 12 14
DN Wyatt (ENG) 28 3 14 11
HK Matthews (WI) 28 3 14 11
KH Brunt (ENG) 28 2 16 10
AE Satterthwaite (NZ) 27 4 13 10
LMM Tahuhu (NZ) 27 4 13 10
TT Beaumont (ENG) 26 3 12 11
EA Perry (AUS) 25 1 13 11
RM Farrell (AUS) 25 1 13 11
BL Mooney (AUS) 24 4 15 5
EJ Villani (AUS) 24 4 16 4
JL Jonassen (AUS) 24 4 15 5
A Shrubsole (ENG) 24 12 12
NR Sciver (ENG) 23 3 9 11
M Kapp (SA) 23 12 11
AJ Blackwell (AUS) 22 4 13 5
SJ McGlashan (NZ) 22 16 6
MJG Nielsen (NZ) 21 1 14 6
SFM Devine (NZ) 21 1 9 11
H Kaur (IND) 20 7 13
AJ Healy (AUS) 20 4 16
L Winfield (ENG) 20 3 7 10
S Mandhana (IND) 19 7 12
A Gardner (AUS) 19 3 16
D Hazell (ENG) 19 3 6 10
CM Edwards (ENG) 19 8 11
DJS Dottin (WI) 17 3 9 5
M Strano (AUS) 17 3 14
NE Bolton (AUS) 17 1 16
KM Beams (AUS) 16 4 7 5
ML Schutt (AUS) 16 4 12
AE Jones (ENG) 16 3 4 9
MM Lanning (AUS) 16 3 13
FC Wilson (ENG) 16 2 14
AR Reakes (AUS) 16 16
D van Niekerk (SA) 16 10 6
EA Leys (AUS) 16 16
EL King (AUS) 16 16
H Graham (AUS) 16 16
LEM Smith (AUS) 16 16
LK Ebsary (AUS) 16 16
SE Aley (AUS) 16 16
A Wellington (AUS) 15 3 12
DM Kimmince (AUS) 15 15
H Birkett (AUS) 15 15
JL Barsby (AUS) 15 15
KL Short (AUS) 15 15
RL Grundy (ENG) 15 4 11
EA Osborne (AUS) 14 1 13
B Hepburn (AUS) 14 14
C Piparo (AUS) 14 14
CL Hall (AUS) 14 14
E Kearney (AUS) 14 14
EA Burns (AUS) 14 14
EJ Inglis (AUS) 14 14
FR Davies (ENG) 14 14
G Redmayne (AUS) 14 14
G Wareham (AUS) 14 14
GL Triscari (AUS) 14 14
GM Hennessy (ENG) 14 14
JE Cameron (AUS) 14 14
KL Britt (AUS) 14 14
KM Mack (AUS) 14 14
S Molineux (AUS) 14 14
SJ Johnson (AUS) 14 14
SN Luff (ENG) 14 14
V Pyke (AUS) 14 14
NE Farrant (ENG) 13 1 12
E Thompson (AUS) 13 13
M Brown (AUS) 13 13
N Plane (AUS) 13 13
NE Stalenberg (AUS) 13 13
NJ Carey (AUS) 13 13
NM Goodwin (AUS) 13 13
RL Haynes (AUS) 13 13
S Bates (AUS) 13 13
JL Gunn (ENG) 12 3 9
S Ecclestone (ENG) 12 2 10
A Hartley (ENG) 12 1 11
GA Elwiss (ENG) 12 1 11
BE Patterson (AUS) 12 12
CE Rudd (ENG) 12 12
GM Harris (AUS) 12 12
JM Dibble (ENG) 12 12
K Sutherland (AUS) 12 12
L Lee (SA) 12 12
SJ Coyte (AUS) 12 12
TJ McPharlin (AUS) 12 12
TM McGrath (AUS) 12 12
A Brindle (ENG) 11 11
A King (AUS) 11 11
A Price (AUS) 11 11
BA Langston (ENG) 11 11
BF Smith (ENG) 11 11
E Jones (ENG) 11 11
GL Adams (ENG) 11 11
HNK Jensen (AUS) 11 11
LA Marsh (ENG) 11 11
LC Sthalekar (AUS) 11 11
LCN Smith (ENG) 11 11
SB Odedra (ENG) 11 11
TF Brookes (ENG) 11 11
E Threlkeld (ENG) 10 10
EJ Smith (AUS) 10 10
EL Lamb (ENG) 10 10
HJ Armitage (ENG) 10 10
JL Hunter (AUS) 10 10
L Harris (AUS) 10 10
S Nitschke (AUS) 10 10
AC Jayangani (SL) 9 4 5
KJ Garth (IRE) 9 3 6
AN Davidson-Richards (ENG) 9 9
CJ Koski (AUS) 9 9
KA Levick (ENG) 9 9
KL Cross (ENG) 9 9
Bismah Maroof (PAK) 8 8
Javeria Khan (PAK) 8 8
Nida Dar (PAK) 8 8
Sana Mir (PAK) 8 8
Sidra Nawaz (PAK) 8 8
M du Preez (SA) 8 2 6
AJ Macleod (ENG) 8 8
KL George (ENG) 8 8
N Brown (ENG) 8 8
P Cleary (AUS) 8 8
SIR Dunkley-Brown (ENG) 8 8
AA Patil (IND) 7 7
E Bisht (IND) 7 7
J Goswami (IND) 7 7
Nain Abidi (PAK) 7 7
Sadia Yousuf (PAK) 7 7
V Krishnamurthy (IND) 7 7
HR Huddleston (NZ) 7 3 4
S Luus (SA) 7 2 5
C Nicholas (ENG) 7 7
C O’Keefe (ENG) 7 7
K Fryett (AUS) 7 7
L Bardsley (AUS) 7 7
L Cheatle (AUS) 7 7
NT Miles (ENG) 7 7
PJ Scholfield (ENG) 7 7
SK Moloney (AUS) 7 7
Anam Amin (PAK) 6 6
Asmavia Iqbal (PAK) 6 6
S Meghana (IND) 6 6
AL Nicholls (ENG) 6 6
B Vakarewa (AUS) 6 6
GJ Gibbs (ENG) 6 6
J Hicks (AUS) 6 6
KJ Hartshorn (AUS) 6 6
LS Greenway (ENG) 6 6
M Banting (AUS) 6 6
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